Publications

*equal contribution

in press

  • Isella*, M., Kanngiesser*, P., & Tomasello, M.. (in press). Children’s selective trust in promises. Child Development, Online First. doi:10.1111/cdev.13105
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    There has been extensive research into the development of selective trust in testimony, but little is known about the development of selective trust in promises. The present research investigates children’s (N~=~264) selective trust in others’ promises to help. In Study 1, 6-year-olds selectively trusted speakers who had previously kept a promise. In Study 2, 5-year-olds displayed selective trust for speakers who had previously kept a prosocial promise (promise to help). In Study 3, 5-year-olds trusted a speaker, who kept a prosocial promise, over a helper. These data suggest that from the age of 5 children show selective trust in others’ promises using prosociality, promise keeping, or both to inform their judgments.

    @article{Isella.2018,
    abstract = {There has been extensive research into the development of selective trust in testimony, but little is known about the development of selective trust in promises. The present research investigates children's (N~=~264) selective trust in others' promises to help. In Study 1, 6-year-olds selectively trusted speakers who had previously kept a promise. In Study 2, 5-year-olds displayed selective trust for speakers who had previously kept a prosocial promise (promise to help). In Study 3, 5-year-olds trusted a speaker, who kept a prosocial promise, over a helper. These data suggest that from the age of 5 children show selective trust in others' promises using prosociality, promise keeping, or both to inform their judgments.},
    author = {Isella*, Margherita and Kanngiesser*, Patricia and Tomasello, Michael},
    year = {in press},
    title = {Children's Selective Trust in Promises},
    volume = {Online First},
    issn = {1467-8624},
    journal = {{Child Development}},
    doi = {10.1111/cdev.13105}
    }

2018

  • Marsh, L. E., Kanngiesser, P., & Hood, B.. (2018). When and how does labour lead to love? the ontogeny and mechanisms of the ikea effect. Cognition, 170, 245–253. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2017.10.012
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    We elevate our constructions to a special status in our minds. This ‘IKEA’ effect leads us to believe that our creations are more valuable than items that are identical, but constructed by another. This series of studies utilises a developmental perspective to explore why this bias exists. Study 1 elucidates the ontogeny of the IKEA effect, demonstrating an emerging bias at age 5, corresponding with key developmental milestones in self-concept formation. Study 2 assesses the role of effort, revealing that the IKEA effect is not moderated by the amount of effort invested in the task in 5-to-6-year olds. Finally, Study 3 examines whether feelings of ownership moderate the IKEA effect, finding that ownership alone cannot explain why children value their creations more. Altogether, results from this study series are incompatible with existing theories of the IKEA bias. Instead, we propose a new framework to examine biases in decision making. Perhaps the IKEA effect reflects a link between our creations and our self-concept, emerging at age 5, leading us to value them more positively than others’ creations.

    @article{Marsh.2018,
    abstract = {We elevate our constructions to a special status in our minds. This 'IKEA' effect leads us to believe that our creations are more valuable than items that are identical, but constructed by another. This series of studies utilises a developmental perspective to explore why this bias exists. Study 1 elucidates the ontogeny of the IKEA effect, demonstrating an emerging bias at age 5, corresponding with key developmental milestones in self-concept formation. Study 2 assesses the role of effort, revealing that the IKEA effect is not moderated by the amount of effort invested in the task in 5-to-6-year olds. Finally, Study 3 examines whether feelings of ownership moderate the IKEA effect, finding that ownership alone cannot explain why children value their creations more. Altogether, results from this study series are incompatible with existing theories of the IKEA bias. Instead, we propose a new framework to examine biases in decision making. Perhaps the IKEA effect reflects a link between our creations and our self-concept, emerging at age 5, leading us to value them more positively than others' creations.},
    author = {Marsh, Lauren E. and Kanngiesser, Patricia and Hood, Bruce},
    year = {2018},
    title = {When and how does labour lead to love? The ontogeny and mechanisms of the IKEA effect},
    keywords = {Child;Child Behavior/psychology;Child Development;Child, Preschool;Female;Humans;Male;Ownership;Psychomotor Performance},
    pages = {245--253},
    volume = {170},
    journal = {Cognition},
    doi = {10.1016/j.cognition.2017.10.012}
    }

2017

  • Kanngiesser, P., Köymen, B., & Tomasello, M.. (2017). Young children mostly keep, and expect others to keep, their promises. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 159, 140–158. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2017.02.004
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Promises are speech acts that create an obligation to do the promised action. In three studies, we investigated whether 3- and 5-year-olds (N=278) understand the normative implications of promising in prosocial interactions. In Study 1, children helped a partner who promised to share stickers. When the partner failed to uphold the promise, 3- and 5-year-olds protested and referred to promise norms. In Study 2, when children in this same age range were asked to promise to continue a cleaning task-and they agreed-they persisted longer on the task and mentioned their obligation more frequently than without such a promise. They also persisted longer after a promise than after a cleaning reminder (Study 3). In prosocial interactions, thus, young children feel a normative obligation to keep their promises and expect others to keep their promises as well.

    @article{Kanngiesser.2017,
    abstract = {Promises are speech acts that create an obligation to do the promised action. In three studies, we investigated whether 3- and 5-year-olds (N=278) understand the normative implications of promising in prosocial interactions. In Study 1, children helped a partner who promised to share stickers. When the partner failed to uphold the promise, 3- and 5-year-olds protested and referred to promise norms. In Study 2, when children in this same age range were asked to promise to continue a cleaning task-and they agreed-they persisted longer on the task and mentioned their obligation more frequently than without such a promise. They also persisted longer after a promise than after a cleaning reminder (Study 3). In prosocial interactions, thus, young children feel a normative obligation to keep their promises and expect others to keep their promises as well.},
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and K{\"o}ymen, Bahar and Tomasello, Michael},
    year = {2017},
    title = {Young children mostly keep, and expect others to keep, their promises},
    keywords = {Attention;Child;Child, Preschool;Comprehension;Concept Formation;Culture;Deception;Female;History, Medieval;Humans;Interpersonal Relations;Male;Social Behavior;Social Responsibility;Social Values;Speech Perception;Verbal Behavior},
    pages = {140--158},
    volume = {159},
    journal = {{Journal of Experimental Child Psychology}},
    doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2017.02.004}
    }

2016

  • Kanngiesser, P., & Woike, J. K.. (2016). Framing the debate on human-like framing effects in bonobos and chimpanzees: a comment on Krupenye et al. (2015). Biology Letters, 12, 20150718. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2015.0718
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2016c,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Woike, Jan Kristian},
    year = {2016},
    title = {Framing the debate on human-like framing effects in bonobos and chimpanzees: a comment on {K}rupenye et al. (2015)},
    pages = {20150718},
    volume = {12},
    journal = {{Biology Letters}},
    doi = {10.1098/rsbl.2015.0718}
    }

  • Kanngiesser, P., Schmidt, M. F. H., & Rossano, F.. (2016). Young children’s understanding of social norms and social institutions. In Kury, H., Redo, S., & Shea, E. (Eds.), In Women and children as victims and offenders: Background, prevention, reintegration. Vol. 1: Suggestions for succeeding generations .
    [BibTeX]
    @incollection{Kanngiesser.2016,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Schmidt, Marco F. H. and Rossano, Federico},
    title = {Young children's understanding of social norms and social institutions},
    editor = {Kury, Helmut and Redo, S{\l}awomir and Shea, Evelyn},
    booktitle = {Women and children as victims and offenders: {B}ackground, prevention, reintegration. {V}ol. 1: {S}uggestions for succeeding generations},
    year = {2016}
    }

  • Hood, B., Weltzien, S., Marsh, L., & Kanngiesser, P.. (2016). Picture yourself: self-focus and the endowment effect in preschool children. Cognition, 152, 70–77. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2016.03.019
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    When an object comes into possession, the owner will typically think that it is worth more than it did before they owned the item in a bias known as the endowment effect. This bias is particularly robust in Western societies with independent self-construals, but has not been observed in children below 5-6years of age. In three studies, we investigated whether endowment effect can be induced in younger children by focusing their attention on themselves. 120 children aged 3-4years evaluated toys before and after a task where they made pictures of themselves, a friend or a neutral farm scene. Over the three studies, children consistently evaluated their own possessions, relative to other identical toys, more positively following the self-priming manipulation. Together these studies support the notion that possessions can form part of an {\textquotedbl}extended self{\textquotedbl} from early on in development and that the endowment effect may be due to an attentional self-bias framing.

    @article{Hood.2016,
    abstract = {When an object comes into possession, the owner will typically think that it is worth more than it did before they owned the item in a bias known as the endowment effect. This bias is particularly robust in Western societies with independent self-construals, but has not been observed in children below 5-6years of age. In three studies, we investigated whether endowment effect can be induced in younger children by focusing their attention on themselves. 120 children aged 3-4years evaluated toys before and after a task where they made pictures of themselves, a friend or a neutral farm scene. Over the three studies, children consistently evaluated their own possessions, relative to other identical toys, more positively following the self-priming manipulation. Together these studies support the notion that possessions can form part of an {\textquotedbl}extended self{\textquotedbl} from early on in development and that the endowment effect may be due to an attentional self-bias framing.},
    author = {Hood, Bruce and Weltzien, Sandra and Marsh, Lauren and Kanngiesser, Patricia},
    year = {2016},
    title = {Picture yourself: Self-focus and the endowment effect in preschool children},
    keywords = {Attention;Child, Preschool;Choice Behavior;Female;Humans;Male;Self Concept},
    pages = {70--77},
    volume = {152},
    journal = {Cognition},
    doi = {10.1016/j.cognition.2016.03.019}
    }

2015

  • Kanngiesser, P., Itakura, S., Zhou, Y., Kanda, T., Ishiguro, H., & Hood, B.. (2015). The role of social eye-gaze in children’s and adults’ ownership attributions to robotic agents in three cultures. Interaction Studies, 16(1), 1–28. doi:10.1075/is.16.1.01kan
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2015b,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Itakura, Shoji and Zhou, Yue and Kanda, Takayuki and Ishiguro, Hiroshi and Hood, Bruce},
    year = {2015},
    title = {The role of social eye-gaze in children's and adults' ownership attributions to robotic agents in three cultures},
    pages = {1--28},
    volume = {16},
    number = {1},
    journal = {{Interaction Studies}},
    doi = {10.1075/is.16.1.01kan}
    }

  • Kanngiesser, P., Rossano, F., & Tomasello, M.. (2015). Late emergence of the first possession heuristic: evidence from a small-scale culture. Child Development, 86(4), 1282–1289. doi:10.1111/cdev.12365
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2015,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Rossano, Federico and Tomasello, Michael},
    year = {2015},
    title = {Late Emergence of the First Possession Heuristic: Evidence From a Small-Scale Culture},
    pages = {1282--1289},
    volume = {86},
    number = {4},
    issn = {1467-8624},
    journal = {{Child Development}},
    doi = {10.1111/cdev.12365}
    }

2014

  • Kanngiesser, P., Itakura, S., & Hood, B. M.. (2014). The effect of labour on ownership decisions in two cultures: developmental evidence from japan and the united kingdom. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 32(3), 320–329. doi:10.1111/bjdp.12043
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2014c,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Itakura, Shoji and Hood, Bruce M.},
    year = {2014},
    title = {The effect of labour on ownership decisions in two cultures: Developmental evidence from Japan and the United Kingdom},
    pages = {320--329},
    volume = {32},
    number = {3},
    issn = {2044-835X},
    journal = {{British Journal of Developmental Psychology}},
    doi = {10.1111/bjdp.12043}
    }

  • Kanngiesser, P., & Hood, B. M.. (2014). Young children’s understanding of ownership rights for newly made objects. Cognitive Development, 29, 30–40. doi:10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.09.003
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2014b,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Hood, Bruce M.},
    year = {2014},
    title = {Young children's understanding of ownership rights for newly made objects},
    pages = {30--40},
    volume = {29},
    issn = {0885-2014},
    journal = {{Cognitive Development}},
    doi = {10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.09.003}
    }

  • Kanngiesser, P., & Hood, B.. (2014). Not by labor alone: considerations for value influence use of the labor rule in ownership transfers. Cognitive Science, 38(2), 353–366. doi:10.1111/cogs.12095
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2014,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Hood, Bruce},
    year = {2014},
    title = {Not by labor alone: Considerations for value influence use of the labor rule in ownership transfers},
    pages = {353--366},
    volume = {38},
    number = {2},
    issn = {1551-6709},
    journal = {{Cognitive Science}},
    doi = {10.1111/cogs.12095}
    }

2012

  • Kanngiesser, P., & Warneken, F.. (2012). Young children consider merit when sharing resources with others. PloS One, 7(8), e43979. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0043979
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2012,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Warneken, Felix},
    year = {2012},
    title = {Young children consider merit when sharing resources with others},
    pages = {e43979},
    volume = {7},
    number = {8},
    issn = {1932-6203},
    journal = {{PloS One}},
    doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0043979}
    }

2011

  • Kanngiesser, P., Sueur, C., Riedl, K., Grossmann, J., & Call, J.. (2011). Grooming network cohesion and the role of individuals in a captive chimpanzee group. American Journal of Primatology, 73(8), 758–767. doi:10.1002/ajp.20914
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2011b,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Sueur, C{\'e}dric and Riedl, Katrin and Grossmann, Johannes and Call, Josep},
    year = {2011},
    title = {Grooming network cohesion and the role of individuals in a captive chimpanzee group},
    pages = {758--767},
    volume = {73},
    number = {8},
    issn = {1098-2345},
    journal = {{American Journal of Primatology}},
    doi = {10.1002/ajp.20914}
    }

  • Kanngiesser, P., Santos, L. R., Hood, B. M., & Call, J.. (2011). The limits of endowment effects in great apes (pan paniscus, pan troglodytes, gorilla gorilla, pongo pygmaeus). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 125(4), 436–445. doi:10.1037/a0024516
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2011,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Santos, Laurie R. and Hood, Bruce M. and Call, Josep},
    year = {2011},
    title = {The limits of endowment effects in great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus)},
    pages = {436--445},
    volume = {125},
    number = {4},
    issn = {1939-2087},
    journal = {{Journal of Comparative Psychology}},
    doi = {10.1037/a0024516}
    }

2010

  • Potì, P., Kanngiesser, P., Saporiti, M., Amiconi, A., Bläsing, B., & Call, J.. (2010). Searching in the middle–-capuchins’ (cebus apella) and bonobos’ (pan paniscus) behavior during a spatial search task. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 36(1), 92–109. doi:10.1037/a0015970
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Poti.2010,
    author = {Pot{\`i}, Patrizia and Kanngiesser, Patricia and Saporiti, Martina and Amiconi, Alessandra and Bl{\"a}sing, Bettina and Call, Josep},
    year = {2010},
    title = {Searching in the middle---Capuchins' (Cebus apella) and bonobos' (Pan paniscus) behavior during a spatial search task},
    pages = {92--109},
    volume = {36},
    number = {1},
    issn = {1939-2184},
    journal = {{Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes}},
    doi = {10.1037/a0015970}
    }

  • Kanngiesser, P., Gjersoe, N., & Hood, B. M.. (2010). The effect of creative labor on property-ownership transfer by preschool children and adults. Psychological Science, 21(9), 1236–1241. doi:10.1177/0956797610380701
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2010b,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Gjersoe, Nathalia and Hood, Bruce M.},
    year = {2010},
    title = {The effect of creative labor on property-ownership transfer by preschool children and adults},
    pages = {1236--1241},
    volume = {21},
    number = {9},
    issn = {0956-7976},
    journal = {{Psychological Science}},
    doi = {10.1177/0956797610380701}
    }

  • Kanngiesser, P., & Call, J.. (2010). Bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orang utans use feature and spatial cues in two spatial memory tasks. Animal Cognition, 13(3), 419–430. doi:10.1007/s10071-009-0291-3
    [BibTeX]
    @article{Kanngiesser.2010,
    author = {Kanngiesser, Patricia and Call, Josep},
    year = {2010},
    title = {Bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orang utans use feature and spatial cues in two spatial memory tasks},
    pages = {419--430},
    volume = {13},
    number = {3},
    issn = {1435-9448},
    journal = {{Animal Cognition}},
    doi = {10.1007/s10071-009-0291-3}
    }

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